Have You Heard Of The 3 Common Back Pain Factors?

Anyone can develop back pain regardless of their health or circumstances. Research has found that some conditions and activities put you at greater risk for developing back pain. This article will discuss the 3 risk factors that are beyond your control.

Back Pain Risk Factors You Can’t Change.

Back pain risk factors beyond your control include your age, sex, and family history.

Age

Despite any age, back pain can be a common problem. In midlife, it becomes more likely that changes will occur in the bones and joints of your spine. This can happen even though you never have had a previous back injury or surgery.

The spinal discs tend to wear out and lose their ability to absorb forces transmitted along the spine. These changes can cause pain which most commonly occurs during middle age.

As we age, bone-related problems may come to the fore. For example, osteoporosis (density loss) can affect spinal bones (vertebrae). It can lead to vertebral fractures, which are sometimes very painful. They could also cause a loss in height or roundness known as kyphosis.

Spinal stenosis is another problem that typically develops after age 60. This is when the spinal canal narrows and presses on nerves.

Age as Back Pain Factor
In middle age, radiating nerve pain is most commonly caused by disc-related problems.

Sex

When it comes to back pain, men and women alike may feel the drag of an injured spine. Studies show that this unfortunate condition plagues us equally overall, but age tends to become more common in females.

Men and women may experience different types of back pain. In Western industrialized societies, men are more prone to suffering from disc problems. Moreover, men are also at greater risk for surgery due to doing jobs that involve heavy lifting or pushing or pulling with their bodies all day long.

Gender as Back Pain Risk Factor
Studies suggest that back pain plagues men and women equally overall, although it tends to become more common in women with age.

On the other hand, backaches are a common occurrence during pregnancy, particularly in the final trimester. Factors that likely contribute to this include ligaments loosening, abdominal muscles stretching or weakening, and carrying a developing baby throughout childbirth. This discomfort usually goes away after your baby is born, but the back pain becomes chronic in some cases.

Women are more likely than men to experience back pain after menopause. Because osteoporosis rates are higher among older ladies than in other populations, they’re at risk for vertebral fractures and associated back pain. Women are more likely than men to develop spondylolisthesis, a condition in which one vertebra slides forward relative to the other below it.

Family History

Studies have shown that genes are a significant factor in determining who will experience back pain and how severe it will be. While back pain can be caused by many different things, including poor posture and injury, heredity is thought to be one of the leading causes of chronic back pain. If you have a family history of back pain, you may be more likely to experience it yourself.

Family history as back pain risk factor
Heredity appears to play a role in certain types of back pain.

Studies have shown that genes are a significant factor in determining who will experience back pain and how severe it will be. While back pain can be caused by many different things, including poor posture and injury, heredity is thought to be one of the leading causes of chronic back pain. If you have a family history of back pain, you may be more likely to experience it yourself.

You are not powerless!

Although you can’t change your genes, sex, or age, remember that you are not powerless regarding your back pain. There are factors you can still change. You are not alone in this journey! Join our insider’s list and share your story with us. We would love to hear how you are coping with back pain and what has worked (or hasn’t) for you. Until then, stay strong and keep moving forward!

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